Articles by "Email"

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Showing posts with label Email. Show all posts

t often happens that when we try logging in to a Google account after some time, we end up forgetting the password. What makes the situation worse is that the same password is also used to log into Gmail, one of the most popular email platform across the world. More dangerous can be that your Google (or Gmail) account gets hacked and the hacker changes the password. While some people use third-party apps to store all their passwords at a single location, many of us don’t. So how do you get your password back or create a new one? Just follow these simple steps to get access back of your Google account. msnTarGet.com
Forgot Gmail or Google account password? Here’s how to recover
Forgot Gmail or Google account password? Here’s how to recover
Forgot Gmail or Google account password? Here’s how to recover
1. Click on ‘Forgot password?’ on the Google login page.
2. Enter the last password that you remember. If you don’t remember than click on the ‘Try another way’ option.
3. Google will then ask if it can send a verification notification on your smartphone that is associated with the account. Fun2Ind.com
4. If you don’t have your phone number near you, Google will try sending you a verification code on the alternate email ID. In case you don’t have an alternate email ID, click on ‘Try another way’ once again.
5. Google will ask you for ANY email ID (that is accessible by you) where it can contact you. Once shared, a verification code will be sent to that email ID. soas.in
6. Once received, fill the code in Google’s dialogue box.
7. Once done, you will be able to access your Gmail or Google account. MobAsk.com

It is recommended that you change the password once you log in and store it somewhere safe that is accessible easily. You can also use third-party apps like LastPass to save all your passwords securely. You can also click/tap on ‘Save password’ when you log in to any service in Chrome. This way, Google saves your password and recommends it the next time you open the service. Apple has a similar tech called ‘iCloud Keychain’.

How many people out there are still using AOL Mail? I assumed it was all of three people, but apparently there’s still a considerable number of you clinging to your aol.com accounts. Do you hope AOL will make a grand resurgence one day? Are you nostalgic for the sounds of a dial-up modem? Do you hate Gmail? You can move providers; it’ll be OK.

In this week’s Tech 911 column, we’re taking a look at a question that has its roots in AOL Mail, but is applicable to everyone who has ever felt that panic when they accidentally sent an email before it was ready (or typo-free).

How Do I Schedule An Email Reply


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Lifehacker reader Mike writes:
“AOL used to offer the ability to write an email and then delay its being sent. In other words, one could compose an email, but not have it be sent until a particular time on the following morning by which time said emailer would have committed the deed. Does AOL Mail still offer this feature? Do any other providers?”
Delayed (or scheduled) sending is one of the best features any email provider, web app, or mobile app can offer. I can’t count the number of times I’ve been rescued by Gmail’s built-in delayed sending feature (which you can set up here, under the “Undo Send” section). When you enable it, Gmail adds an automatic delay of up to 30 seconds, which gives you a small window to undo your message if you suddenly realize you made a catastrophic mistake.

The problem with this feature—and I’m lumping the concept of “scheduled emails” in there as well, which allows you to set a specific time for when you want an email to go out—is that it all depends on what how you’re accessing a particular email service.

For example, Undo Send works perfectly in the web-based version of Gmail, but you can’t access this functionality if you’re using a Gmail app (at least, not when I wrote this column). The same is true for Outlook’s “delayed” and “scheduled” features—they work great in the desktop apps, not so much the online or mobile apps.

There are apps that come with delayed or scheduled sending built-in, and you should be able to use them to send and receive messages from most major email services. Try checking out Spark (for iOS) or MailDroid (for Android), which make it easy to schedule emails whenever you want.

You can also pick up a browser extension to enable this feature (or an even better version of it) for email services you already use. For example, Boomerang is an incredible extension for Gmail (or Outlook) that adds a lot more functionality beyond the simpler Undo Send feature—namely, email scheduling, rather than just a delay. With luck, Google will eventually bake this kind of a feature directly into Gmail, but for not, an extension is your best bet.

Lifehacker readers: Do you have any favorite apps, services, or extensions you use to schedule emails? Let us know in the comments!

Last week, I sent an email in which “Sorry about that!” was my automatic reply—I had forgotten something, and the person’s curt message made clear that they were less than pleased with me. But after a minute of consideration, I took out the “sorry” and told them I’d do what they were requesting ASAP. I did, the task got done and everyone was fine. No harm, no foul.

How to Stop Writing 'I'm Sorry' So Often in Emails

How to Stop Writing 'I'm Sorry' So Often in Emails
How to Stop Writing 'I'm Sorry' So Often in Emails

Days later, I’m still thinking about that email and if my reply came off rudely or not. To be clear, being rude was not my intention; when I took that extra minute to think about my response, I realized I had done nothing worthy of an apology. But as a woman (particularly a young woman responding to someone much older, and theoretically more authoritative), you get used to playing certain roles.

And the Automatic Apologizer is one of the most common, and one of the most difficult to break. Women are taught to be passive and make everyone comfortable. Our default is to apologize, even if there’s really nothing to apologize for. And I say this as someone who has apologized to inanimate objects more than once.

Writes Leah Fessler for Quartz:
As countless studies have proven, women apologize far more frequently than men do, largely because men are socialized to believe they have far less to apologize for.

This habit translates seamlessly online, where “lady language” manifests in women’s incessant use of exclamation points, reassuring emojis, and typed-out “sorry!!!”s. Such “hedges,” as gender linguist Susan Herring calls them, are the emotional labor of digital communication.
It’s something I’ve become more conscious of in the past year, and have taken steps to change. Playing the role of the meek people pleaser is very 2017 Alicia. That’s not to say I’m never apologizing again—some actions certainly warrant it. But not responding to someone’s email quickly enough or completing a task differently than someone else suggested do not rise to that level.

The key to saying “I’m sorry” less is, of course, being aware that you’re doing it. Taking a beat before rushing to respond helps. That’s one of the reasons why taking extra time to answer messages has become one of the most useful habits I’ve picked up in the past year or so. I write a response, sit back or switch tabs briefly, and then come back to it.

Another trick I like: Substitute “thanks” for “sorry,” as Quartz suggests. Instead of writing “sorry about that!” for example, you might write, “thanks for pointing that out.” Gmail also has a plug-in that can point out instances where you’re undermining yourself by using phrases like “I’m sorry,” “I just” and the cringingly passive, “I’m no expert but.”

If you don’t like these suggestions ... thanks for pointing that out. There. That was easy.

Gou’ve sent an important email to a colleague but it is lost in the deluge of emails they receive every day, buried and forgotten. They can obviously use Gmail search operators, like FROM: or SUBJECT:, to locate that email later but wouldn’t it be useful if there were a way to directly locate that one missing email in their mailbox.

Help Locate your own Email Message in Someone Else’s Gmail

Well, there’s an alternate search trick and the sender can actually help the recipient find any specific email message that they have sent in the past.

When you send an email through Gmail, a unique Message ID is added to the email header as per the RFC 822 specification. To know the ID of your message, open the email inside Gmail, go to 3-dot menu and choose Show Original. The Message-ID will be displayed in the first line of the header as shown the screenshot.
Help Locate your own Email Message in Someone Else’s Gmail
The Message ID of a particular email message is exactly the same for both the sender and the recipient. That means if the recipient opens the header of your email in their mailbox, the message ID will match that of the message in your Gmail sent folder.

Gmail offers a lesser-known search operator – rfc822msgid – that helps you search emails by their message ID.

So if our message ID is xyz@mail.gmail.com, a simple search like rfc8222msgid:xyz@mail.gmail.com will return the exact email in search results.
Help Locate your own Email Message in Someone Else’s Gmail
Help Locate your own Email Message in Someone Else’s Gmail

And that’s the trick. This search query will work for both the recipient and the email sender. So if you pass the message ID to the recipient, they can simply use the rfc822msgid operator to locate a specific email from you in their own mailbox.

Since the recipient ID is too complex, you can simply copy of the URL of the Gmail search page and pass them to the recipient. The URL will work for them as well since the Message ID is the same for them as well.

You can also use this search trick to bookmark emails in the browser.

October 22, 2018 , , ,
The default layout of your Gmail inbox has the sender’s name listed in the left column followed by the subject and the date of the message. The emails are sorted in reverse chronological order with the newest messages listed at the top. The problem with this layout is that you cannot figure out who the actual sender of a message is without actually opening the email. For instance, if you get an email from Angus who works at Google and a different email from another Angus who is employed with Microsoft, Gmail will show Angus as the sender for both emails. To solve this exact problem, I wrote Gmail Sender Icons and it is now available for everyone. It is a Google Chrome extension that will make it easy for you to identify the company or the organisation of the email sender right inside the message list of your Gmail inbox. Check out the demo video and you’ll get the idea
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The Gmail add-on extracts the email address of the sender, parses the website domain from the address and pulls the favicon image (often same as the logo) of the domain. It then appends the logo image and the company’s domain as a label to the message subject thus making it easy for you quickly identify the message sender. It runs entirely in your browser and not even a byte of your Gmail data is shared with anyone outside your browser. The Chrome extension internally uses the InboxSDK library to parse emails on the client’s side. When your inbox is flooded with emails and you’d only like to focus your attention on messages that are from known senders, this Gmail extension will be a big help. It shows the sender label in default message views and the search results. You can also use Gmail Sender Icons to quickly identify emails from known domains in the spam folder that may have been mistakenly identified as spam by Gmail filters. Give it a shot. Gmail Sender Icons

May 14, 2018 , ,
Gmail’s much-awaited update has been rolled out for a lot of users and is creating an intense hype owing to the new features that it brings to the platform. Reportedly, the revamp of the most used mail service costed Google a fortune, but it also aims at providing exceptional mailing experience to the users. Users of the previous version of the Gmail can update to the new one pretty easily by clicking on the gear icon on the upper right side of their screen and then clicking on ‘Try new Gmail’. The latest update has been said to bring a plethora of new features which are bound to surprise a lot of people. Let’s dive right in and see the top five features of the new Gmail.
Top 5 Features of the New Gmail Update
Confidential Mode When talking about the new update of Gmail it is hard to miss out on the ‘Confidential Mode’, it can also be said that this new feature is the one which has garnered the most attention. Like the name points out the confidential mode on Gmail will allow the users to have full control over how their mail is going to be used. This new feature will allow the receivers to only open by mail by entering a passcode which will be sent via SMS to their phones. Also, senders will be able to put an expiration date on sent emails, after which the email would be destroyed. This new additional feature is going to prohibit receivers from copying, forwarding, downloading and printing their emails. From a business point of view, this feature can be an essential one for a lot of people. Also, it is to be kept in mind that Google will release the update in a phased manner which means that not everyone will have access to the feature right away.
Smart Replies Although, Google has now explicitly named this feature this isn’t something entirely new to the platform. Under this functionality Google will scan through the mail and based on the context, it will suggest some probable replies to the users. Previous users of Gmail Android and iOS will relate to this since this feature has previously been seen on these two mobile platforms. This is expected to make replies easier for email receivers.
Improved Security and High-Priority Notifications
Google will now intensify the use of their Machine Learning algorithm capabilities to provide better security and privacy for their users. Under this, Google will alert users of emails which might be potentially threatening to the desktop users of the service. The platform will also suggest users unsubscribe from certain newsletters or emails if they don’t seem to be paying attention to them for quite some time. The Machine Learning aspect of Gmail will also cater to the high-priority notification which will ensure that really important emails aren’t missed out by the receiver.
New Customisations and Service Integrations It is being said that this new update has brought a lot of changes to the platform and did it too fast. That means there could be some problem for the users to get accustomed to the new interface. However, there is no denying the fact that the new Gmail has become better and more secure with the new upgrade. Also, the interface of the platform has gone through a revamp for better. Apart from the basic changes, Gmail has also now integrated its most used services in the Gmail desktop itself. It will include the likes of Google Keep, Google Calendar and Google Tasks etc. This integration of services will allow users to add events to their calendar, make notes in keep and access all of these through a single window.
Smart Compose This new feature is something which is yet to fully arrive on the platform. The new ‘Smart Compose’ functionality was announced by Google at the company’s annual developer conference Google I/O 2018. This new feature on the platform will help users autocomplete mails as they type the content in the compose window. Again, Google will probably make use of the machine learning algorithm to understand the context of the email and will then suggest phrases which can be possibly used by the sender. This feature is expected to make email composition a lot easier and faster for the Gmail users.

April 28, 2018 , , ,
It has been a few months since the Apple iPhone X has hit the shelves around the globe. The device was the first by Apple to come with a ‘notch’ and the developers were quick enough to make their apps support the new display design. Google, being one of the biggest developers, did make its Gmail support the new display design carried by the iPhone X but it ignored the alternative – Inbox by Google. However, after months, the search giant has finally said it is working to make Inbox by Google, support the iPhone X. The news came directly from the company itself to Wall Street Journal. The report says that Google plans to update the Gmail alternative ‘soon’.
Google to soon bring Apple iPhone X support for its Gmail alternative
However, the exact date is not yet known. “Also, this didn’t make the column, but: Inbox for iPhone X is coming. Google says soon. It did a bunch of crazy one-off interface stuff that the X totally broke, and it took way longer to update then Google expected. (Also Gmail is clearly more important.),” tweeted David Pierce from the Wall Street Journal. The search giant has been focussing a lot on its Gmail service lately. Few days ago, the company revamped the UI of Gmail for all the users across the globe.
In addition to this some new features are also there such as Confidential Mode, Offline Support, Nudging feature, option to access the attachment without opening the mail, high priority push notifications, assistive unsubscribe, smart replies, new side panel and much more. The rollout of the ‘new’ Gmail UI and features has already begun and will be phased over the next few months. The ‘regular’ Gmail users can try the new features under the Settings menu where an option of ‘Try new Gmail’ will be available. However, this too will be phased so if you don’t find it immediately do not panic.

April 27, 2018 ,
15 email habits that may make people hate you
With the rapid growth of smartphones, the mode of communications – in both personal and professional sphere – has changed dramatically. WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, iMessage, Google Hangouts are all commonly used to communicate. One mode, however, remains a constant and that is email. The impact of other modes has unfortunately filtered down to emails also. Other modes are rather informal even if they might be used for formal communication. In such cases, the informality creeps into emails as well and it is simply unprofessional, lazy and bordering on not being serious. That’s why we are listing 15 habits that are annoying and you should stop (that is if you’re using them) with immediate effect while writing and sending emails.
1. ​Marking an email urgent when it's really not : Think before using the word urgent. Just because you’ve the urgency to send out an email doesn’t mean the recipient needs to see it urgently. Be judicious while sending “urgent” emails as seeing a mail which is anything but that is downright annoying.
2. Missing the subject line : It’s a professional email and the least you can do is put a subject line. It doesn’t take too much time to write a few words about what’s in the mail. Also, seeing “no subject” while trying to search an email is tedious. Putting in a subject always helps.
3. ​Incorrect spellings and typos : In this digital era, there’s simply no excuse for making spelling mistakes. Use a smartphone and are in a rush to send out the mail? There’s a dictionary and an autocorrect feature that is just there to help you avoid making spelling mistakes. Don’t be under the impression that a spelling mistake here and there won’t be noticed just because you typed it on a smartphone.
4. ​Use of SMS language in emails : Are you still using a Nokia 3310 or a feature phone? No, right? Then do note that thanks is spelt as T-H-A-N-K-S and not “tks” or “thx”. Similarly, sorry is spelt as S-O-R-R-Y and not “sry”. By using text speak in emails you’re just giving out an impression of being too lazy. It’s a professional email, keep it professional.
5. ​Writing appropriate subject lines : Often one receives emails where the entire text of the mail is written in the subject. There’s a reason why the subject is called the subject and there’s a place for one to put the text in the body.
6. ​Requesting read receipts : If you are asking people to send read receipts it show two things: a) you are either too desperate to know that the other person has read your email; or b) you don’t trust them to have read your mail. You don’t want to appear either of the two, so don’t ask for read receipts.
7. ​Using emojis in an email : This is an email we are talking about, not Snapchat or Instagram posts. If you’re happy about something, say “I am delighted” rather than using an emoji. There’s a time and place for using emojis and an email is certainly not one of them.
8. ​Get your punctuation sorted : While it’s slightly acceptable to get a comma or full stop wrong (blame it on smartphones), what’s not acceptable is this: !!!!!!. Too many exclamation marks have no place for in an email – or for that matter anywhere. There are other ways to express excitement or anger rather than incessantly pressing the exclamation key on the keyboard.
9. ​Choose the right font : Believe it or not one still comes across Comic Sans in emails. What makes it worse is sometimes it’s in different colours. All you need is a ‘regular’ font, black text and no background image. Unless you’re sending a birthday invite for a two-year old, then unleash your creativity as you like.
10. ​Replying to all when it’s not meant for an individual : Yes, there are a lot of mails you get where there are tons of other recipients marked. However, always be careful when replying to such mails. A mail which has no purpose or meaning to someone shouldn’t be sent from professional IDs. There’s a folder for such mails and its called Junk or Spam.
11. ​Using the CC and BCC feature : It is extremely convenient and handy yet when used incorrectly the CC and BCC feature can be terribly irritating. Always ask the other person before marking them on BCC or CC. It’s not right to give out information without someone who is new to the entire conversation.
12. ​Mails with a lot “history” : Unless you want to show a particular chain of mails/events, always delete the unnecessary history from the mail. No one wants to see or read things which aren’t relevant in the current conversation or context. It doesn’t take too much time to erase the past mails and make it look ‘neat’
13. ​Think before sending attachments : Do not send unnecessary attachments with an email. Even though space isn’t too much of an issue but at times an important email might take too much time to download under the ‘burden’ of an attachment. Think before attaching any heavy file – image, PDF report or video – with the email.
14. ​Length of an email : Now this is a bit subjective but ensure that the mail you sent is neither too short nor too long. No one likes to read long essays, so try keeping professional mails as concise as you can. Similarly, if someone has asked you question which needs a slightly detailed response, don’t send monosyllabic answers.
15. ​Delayed replies to emails : At times, it happens with everyone that we sometimes forget to reply to an email. However, if it’s a professional or official mail, in all probability it does merit a response. Don’t sit on it for too long or worse completely forget about replying to it. One can simply send polite replies like “Will revert soon” or “working on it” so that the other person doesn’t feel completely ignored.

Google overhauls Gmail to lure businesses away from Microsoft
San Francisco: Alphabet Inc.’s Google unveiled on Wednesday its first Gmail redesign since 2013, capping what the company says was an expensive overhaul two years in the making to adopt security and offline functionality and better resemble Microsoft Outlook. It is Google’s most extensive update to software in its G Suite workplace bundle since accelerating efforts to steal business from Microsoft Corp.’s dominant Office workplace software suite. Previously, G Suite added instant-messaging and spreadsheet features.
With Gmail, Google said it restructured email storage databases, unified three duelling systems for syncing messages across devices and upgraded computers underpinning the service. That shift to Google’s self-developed Tensor processing chips enables smart-assistant features such as “suggested replies” to messages and “nudges” to respond to forgotten emails. “This is an entire rewrite of our flagship, most-used product,” said Jacob Bank, product manager lead for Gmail, which 1.4 billion people use each month.
Unreliable offline access to email has long discouraged would-be customers, while recent high-profile corporate data breaches have increased their desire to lock down email. Analysts estimate G Suite generated about $2 billion in revenue last year, 10 times behind Office. Google declined to specify costs associated with the redesign. But parent Alphabet reported Monday that first-quarter capital expenditures nearly tripled year-over-year to $7.3 billion.
Chief financial officer Ruth Porat told analysts that half of the spending resulted from hardware purchases to support expanding use of machine learning, which describes automated programs that can, among other things, identify spam and predict which emails users would find most important.

April 25, 2018 , , , ,
New Gmail is here: 14 new features you should know - Gmail Google Email
There's no denying that Gmail is one of the – if not the – most popular email services used by people around the world. After a long gap, Google’s mail service is getting a major overhaul which is now being rolled out to users. The search giant confirmed that the update is being released and will bring a host of new features to the service. The new features deal with security, confidentiality, better usability among other things. The rollout has begun today and will be phased over the next few months. The ‘regular’ Gmail users can try the new features under the Settings menu where an option of ‘Try new Gmail’ will be available. However, this too will be phased so if you don’t find it immediately do not panic. Here are 14 features that Gmail is getting for a better user experience:
1. Integrated rights management : Block recipients from forwarding, downloading or printing your mail : This is meant more for business users as it gives users an option to block the forwarding, copying, downloading or even printing of particular messages.
2. Confidential mode: Set expiry dates to your mails : As the name suggests, this gives users an option to set an expiration date to an email or they can completely revoke it. What Gmail does is in the confidential mode is that it doesn’t send the content of the mail. Rather, a link to the content is sent which on opening displays as a regular email in a Gmail client.
3. Two-factor authentication comes to mails : In the confidential mode, Gmail is also offering 2FA or two-factor authentication protection. A recipient of a mail in confidential mode will have to enter a SMS passcode to read the message.
4. Snooze feature: Schedule important mails : This will come in handy for those who often forget to reply to important mails. A new snooze feature will now allow users to schedule important mails to pin at the top of the inbox at a later stage.
5. Offline support: Access your mails even when you don't have internet data : Now Gmail will have an ‘offline’ version where users can work on in case there’s no connectivity. The messages will be synced and downloaded as soon as one is connected to the Internet.
6. Nudging feature: Get reminders for important mails you may have missed : What Nudges will do is that it will bring up emails older than two days to the top of the inbox. It’s not a random bump of old mails as Google is using machine learning to identify which mails are ‘important’. If an email has a direct question and hasn’t been replied to, that email will also be flagged up.
7. Access attachment option without opening the mail : Attachments with emails will now be visible in the inbox. There will be an icon below the message which people can access without opening the mail.
8. High-priority push notifications : A new feature called High Priority notifications is being introduced which will filter out the number of notifications. Notifications will mainly be sent for mails which are considered important or urgent. Google says that almost 97% per cent of push notifications will be reduced.
9. Assistive unsubscribe: One-click option to get rid of pesky mailing lists : Now a one-click option will be available to users from unsubscribing from pesky mailing lists. These messages aren’t really read by most users or fall in the Spam folder.
10. Smart reply feature comes to web : The Smart reply feature will be available on the Web client of Gmail. It’s already there on the mobile version and basically gives three short replies to email. The replies can be edited or immediately sent, depending on what a user wants to do.
11. New side panel : A new side panel will now be available on the right side of the screen and will list the most-used Google apps. It will include Calendar, Tasks among others. The idea behind this, according to Google, is that users don’t have to leave Gmail to access other apps.
12. New interface: Gets a 'less cluttered' look : The user interface will be more attractive and have a less cluttered look. This feature, however, will only be for the Web version of Gmail.
13. Google Tasks app for Android and iOS : A new Google Tasks app for G Suite users on Android and iOS is also being released. The app will allow G Suite users to keep their tasks up-to-date on their smartphones. The changes will show in the Google Tasks on the desktop as well.
14. Phishing warning gets better : While phishing warnings aren’t new but the new update of Gmail makes it better. Google will flag all potential phishing mails with banners which will be coloured – red, yellow or grey – depending on the risk factor.

April 25, 2018 ,
New Gmail Is Now Rolling Out, Here's How to Get It Right Now
Alphabet's Google unveiled on Wednesday its first Gmail redesign since 2013, capping what the company says was an expensive overhaul two years in the making to adopt security and offline functionality and better resemble Microsoft Outlook. It is Google's most extensive update to software in its G Suite workplace bundle since accelerating efforts to steal business from Microsoft Corp's dominant Office workplace software suite. Previously, G Suite added instant-messaging and spreadsheet features. With Gmail, Google said it restructured email storage databases, unified three duelling systems for syncing messages across devices and upgraded computers underpinning the service.
That shift to Google's self-developed Tensor processing chips enables smart-assistant features such as "suggested replies" to messages and "nudges" to respond to forgotten emails. "This is an entire rewrite of our flagship, most-used product," said Jacob Bank, product manager lead for Gmail, which 1.4 billion people use each month. Unreliable offline access to email has long discouraged would-be customers, while recent high-profile corporate data breaches have increased their desire to lock down email.
Analysts estimate G Suite generated about $2 billion (roughly Rs. 13,300 crores) in revenue last year, 10 times behind Office. Google declined to specify costs associated with the redesign. But parent Alphabet reported Monday that first-quarter capital expenditures nearly tripled year-over-year to $7.3 billion (roughly Rs. 48,700 crores). Chief Financial Officer Ruth Porat told analysts that half of the spending resulted from hardware purchases to support expanding use of machine learning, which describes automated programs that can, among other things, identify spam and predict which emails users would find most important.
Security and smarts Google's Bank said the overhaul was required primarily to provide offline access to up to 90 days of emails for users who turn on the feature. The changes also fulfil another top demand of business executives - message expiration. Users who enable a "confidential" option when sending an email can time-limit its access to recipients and also require they enter a one-time passcode sent to their phones to read it. The new setting does not override corporate email retention policies or present new obstacles to law enforcement. "Nudges" and a higher bar for new-mail notifications round out Google's revised sales pitch.
The company estimated that nudges will lead 8 percent of business users each week to remember to follow-up on something important. Cosmetic changes bring Gmail's website in line with Office by placing Google's calendar, tasks and note-taking services within the same page as emails. Bank said testers have advanced from "neutral to positive to very positive" on the new look.
How to get New Gmail right now You can start using these new updates in Gmail on the Web today, with some features appearing within the coming weeks. Go to Settings (the cog wheel in the top right corner of your inbox) and select Try the new Gmail. If you want to switch back later down the road, you can go to the same place and select Go back to classic Gmail.

April 17, 2018 ,
Gmail will soon let you send emails with an expiry date
Google recently confirmed it is working on redesigning its popular Gmail service. However, it’s not just the design that will be new as it looks like the service will get new features as well. One of the features has been unearthed by TechCrunch. The report says that Gmail will also be getting the ability to self-destruct an email.
As seen in the screenshot shared by the report, the email after a specified time becomes unreadable. Users can send an email with an expiry date by clicking on the small lock icon seen while composing an email. The icon called as ‘confidential mode’ suggests that the recipient won’t be able to share the content inside the email with someone else as he/she won't be able to copy the content, download or print it.
However, a screenshot can be taken as it has been shared by Techcrunch. The self-destructing email’s time limit can also be specified by the sender. The time limit options include one week, one month or multiple years. It is also possible for the sender to confirm the recipient's identity with a passcode via a text message. It is not for sure if this feature will be compatible with those recipients who are using a different email service.
Furthermore, the report says that Gmail didn’t mention the mail is encrypted anywhere. Whatever might be the case, we may hear more about it at the upcoming Google IO 2018 conference where Google is also likely to reveal the resigned Gmail UI. The revamped Gmail service is said to let users directly access the Google Calendar via Gmail.
The redesign might also include the option to snooze emails so they later appear in the inbox. It is also expected that the company might introduce an offline email storage option. The new design is said to be available as part of early adopter plan and will be later rolled out to regular users.

April 07, 2018 ,
15 email habits that may make people hate you
With the rapid growth of smartphones, the mode of communications – in both personal and professional sphere – has changed dramatically. WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, iMessage, Google Hangouts are all commonly used to communicate. One mode, however, remains a constant and that is email. The impact of other modes has unfortunately filtered down to emails also. Other modes are rather informal even if they might be used for formal communication. In such cases, the informality creeps into emails as well and it is simply unprofessional, lazy and bordering on not being serious. That’s why we are listing 15 habits that are annoying and you should stop (that is if you’re using them) with immediate effect while writing and sending emails.
1. ​Marking an email urgent when it's really not : Think before using the word urgent. Just because you’ve the urgency to send out an email doesn’t mean the recipient needs to see it urgently. Be judicious while sending “urgent” emails as seeing a mail which is anything but that is downright annoying.
2. Missing the subject line : It’s a professional email and the least you can do is put a subject line. It doesn’t take too much time to write a few words about what’s in the mail. Also, seeing “no subject” while trying to search an email is tedious. Putting in a subject always helps.
3. ​Incorrect spellings and typos : In this digital era, there’s simply no excuse for making spelling mistakes. Use a smartphone and are in a rush to send out the mail? There’s a dictionary and an autocorrect feature that is just there to help you avoid making spelling mistakes. Don’t be under the impression that a spelling mistake here and there won’t be noticed just because you typed it on a smartphone.
4. ​Use of SMS language in emails : Are you still using a Nokia 3310 or a feature phone? No, right? Then do note that thanks is spelt as T-H-A-N-K-S and not “tks” or “thx”. Similarly, sorry is spelt as S-O-R-R-Y and not “sry”. By using text speak in emails you’re just giving out an impression of being too lazy. It’s a professional email, keep it professional.
5. ​Writing appropriate subject lines : Often one receives emails where the entire text of the mail is written in the subject. There’s a reason why the subject is called the subject and there’s a place for one to put the text in the body.
6. ​Requesting read receipts : If you are asking people to send read receipts it show two things: a) you are either too desperate to know that the other person has read your email; or b) you don’t trust them to have read your mail. You don’t want to appear either of the two, so don’t ask for read receipts.
7. ​Using emojis in an email : This is an email we are talking about, not Snapchat or Instagram posts. If you’re happy about something, say “I am delighted” rather than using an emoji. There’s a time and place for using emojis and an email is certainly not one of them.
8. ​Get your punctuation sorted : While it’s slightly acceptable to get a comma or full stop wrong (blame it on smartphones), what’s not acceptable is this: !!!!!!. Too many exclamation marks have no place for in an email – or for that matter anywhere. There are other ways to express excitement or anger rather than incessantly pressing the exclamation key on the keyboard.
9. ​Choose the right font : Believe it or not one still comes across Comic Sans in emails. What makes it worse is sometimes it’s in different colours. All you need is a ‘regular’ font, black text and no background image. Unless you’re sending a birthday invite for a two-year old, then unleash your creativity as you like.
10. ​Replying to all when it’s not meant for an individual : Yes, there are a lot of mails you get where there are tons of other recipients marked. However, always be careful when replying to such mails. A mail which has no purpose or meaning to someone shouldn’t be sent from professional IDs. There’s a folder for such mails and its called Junk or Spam.
11. ​Using the CC and BCC feature : It is extremely convenient and handy yet when used incorrectly the CC and BCC feature can be terribly irritating. Always ask the other person before marking them on BCC or CC. It’s not right to give out information without someone who is new to the entire conversation.
12. ​Mails with a lot “history” : Unless you want to show a particular chain of mails/events, always delete the unnecessary history from the mail. No one wants to see or read things which aren’t relevant in the current conversation or context. It doesn’t take too much time to erase the past mails and make it look ‘neat’
13. ​Think before sending attachments : Do not send unnecessary attachments with an email. Even though space isn’t too much of an issue but at times an important email might take too much time to download under the ‘burden’ of an attachment. Think before attaching any heavy file – image, PDF report or video – with the email.
14. ​Length of an email : Now this is a bit subjective but ensure that the mail you sent is neither too short nor too long. No one likes to read long essays, so try keeping professional mails as concise as you can. Similarly, if someone has asked you question which needs a slightly detailed response, don’t send monosyllabic answers.
15. ​Delayed replies to emails : At times, it happens with everyone that we sometimes forget to reply to an email. However, if it’s a professional or official mail, in all probability it does merit a response. Don’t sit on it for too long or worse completely forget about replying to it. One can simply send polite replies like “Will revert soon” or “working on it” so that the other person doesn’t feel completely ignored.

March 18, 2018 , , ,
How to manage storage on Gmail
Gmail is undoubtedly one of the most used email service today. And while most of us may find it indispensable and immensely useful, there is one problem that mostly everyone encounters with it -- managing storage. It’s hard to keep a track of when we end up using the 15GB of storage space that it offers, and the next thing we know is Google asking us to pay to get more storage. If you have been considering to do that, wait before you read this, as here we tell you ways to manage the limited storage on Gmail more effectively.
Step 1: Open Gmail
Step 2: Scroll down to the bottom and you’ll see how much storage you have used. Select ‘Manage’ written below it.
Step 3: On clicking it, you’ll be taken to a page called Drive Storage. Here, you’ll see a pie chart of how much storage you have used and various plans to buy additional storage.
Step 4: Press ‘View Details’ below the pie chart.
Step 5: On doing this you’ll see the exactly how much storage you have used in Google Drive, Gmail and Photos.
Step 6: Select the option of ‘Learn More.’
Step 7: This will take you to a page called Google Drive Help. Here you’ll find a number of instructions on how you can manage your storage.
Step 8: If you have too many items in your trash then go to drive.google.com. After this, click Trash on the left. Click 'Empty Trash' one you are sure that your trash folder doesn't have any files you would want to recover.
Step 9:Google Drive Help also has a link Under the section ‘Option 1: Clear Space’ which lets you see which of your files take up the most space. On seeing this list you can decide which files are not of your use and delete them.
Step 10: If your photos are taking to much storage, then go to ‘Learn more about photo storage’ in Google Drive Help. You’ll be taken to a new page which will have the links to adjust the quality of images saved. Step 11: Clear out Trash and spam folders in Gmail as they take up space too, and regularly delete the emails that are not important.

February 04, 2018 , ,
How to automatically forward Gmail messages to another account
If you have a presence anywhere on the web then you must be aware of Gmail, one of the Google's most-widely used email platform. With over a billion users around the globe, Gmail over the years has evolved in more than one ways. Feature-wise it is one of the best emailing services. And among those hundreds of features, one such feature that you may not be aware of is automatic forwarding of emails to a different account.
Yes, it is possible for you to forward select emails or all of them to a different account once they arrive in the particular Gmail account. So how can you do this? Here are some easy steps: It is worth mentioning that this feature is only possible to setup while on the desktop. Also, those emails arriving in the 'Spam' folder won't get forwarded.
Step 1: In the top right, click Settings gear icon.
Step 2: Click on Forwarding and POP/IMAP tab.
Step 3: Under the "Forwarding" section, click Add a forwarding address.
Step 4: Enter the email address where you want the messages to get forwarded automatically.
Step 5: Click 'Next' and 'Proceed' to complete the process.
Step 6: Once done, a verification message will be sent to that email address. Click on that.
Step 7: Go back to the Gmail account Setting page and refresh it.
Step 8: Click on Forward a copy of incoming mail to.
Step 9: Click 'Save Changes' at the end of the page.
To disable the particular feature, follow until Step 2 as mentioned above and then go for:
Step 3: Under the "Forwarding" section, click Disable forwarding.
Step 4: Click 'Save Changes' at the end of the page.
If you want to forward certain kinds of messages: To forward certain kind of messages, you need to create a filter for such messages. While setting up the filter, you need to add the email address on which you want these messages to get forwarded to. This can be done only once you have the email forwarding feature enabled.

Gmail launches its first public iOS beta to test support for third-party accounts
Google wants to make Gmail the place where you check all your email accounts, not just your Google accounts. The company announced this week it’s testing a new version of the Gmail app on iOS that will allow users to add their non-Google accounts, including those from Outlook (including Hotmail or Live), Yahoo, and elsewhere.
The announcement, which was sent out via a tweet from the @gmail Twitter account, invited users to sign up to test a version of the Gmail iOS app with this new feature.
The link takes users to an online form where they consent to joining the Gmail beta program. This requires users to have a current version of the official Gmail iOS app on iOS 10 or higher, and have at least one non-Google email account they would like to add to Gmail.

The form further asks them to check off which non-Google accounts they use from a list that includes Outlook, Hotmail, Live, Yahoo, Yandex, Mail.ru, or “Other.”

Because this is an iOS beta, there’s not an option to download the beta app from the App Store directly. Instead, betas are distributed through Apple’s TestFlight platform.

Notably, a Google spokesperson tells us this is the first time that the company has made a beta version of Gmail for iOS available through TestFlight with external users.
However, it’s not the first time Google has offered beta versions of its apps in general – it runs betas of many of its Android apps through Google Play today, and has for some time.
“We’re always experimenting with ways to improve user experience in Gmail, but we don’t have any additional details to share at this time,” a Google spokesperson said, when asked for details about its iOS beta program.

The company declined to say how many users will be allowed into the TestFlight beta trial, or what the company’s larger intentions are with the program.

For example, it wouldn’t confirm if the test was an attempt to measure much demand for such a feature, or if the addition was something Google planned to publicly release in the future. It’s also unclear if the TestFlight program will continue after this test wraps to trial other pre-release features in the future.
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July 21, 2017 , ,
7 Common Email Pitching Mistakes PR Managers Should AvoidWhile it might not be as effective as presenting in person, pitching via email is the most commonly used technique to send press releases to the media. This can be effective, and it can be a simple and useful tool to maintain good relationships with journalists, however there are certain golden rules that you’ll need to follow. Plus, there are some big mistakes that you’ll need to avoid in order to make sure you’re pitching successfully, so make sure you act on these following seven mistakes and avoid them at all costs.

1. You’ve Made It about You and Your Business
While you may be super excited about the business or concept that you’re pitching, you’ll get the best responses when you make your pitch about the benefits the journalist, their readers, and their paper can enjoy when they publish your story. You need to frame your pitch in a way that makes it appealing to the media, not just your business and consumers. Muck Rack can help you monitor the news, so you know exactly what the papers are looking for in a story, and you can hand it to them in your pitch.

2. You’re Not Offering a Hook
A press release isn’t quite the same as a story, and it’s not automatically newsworthy. Provide a very brief introduction and a couple of bullet points offering information on exactly how your press release is newsworthy and why it’s worth the journalist writing a story. Cision can provide you with all the analytics you need to figure out what’s a newsworthy story and what isn’t.

3. Your Pitch is Too Convoluted
Using a long-winded and wordy pitch can instantly put a journalist off reading through your whole text, and they may decline to insert your story into the news at all. It can pay off to have a proficient editor, and it’s really easy to hire one from Ukwritings or Big Assignments to make sure that you keep your emails brief and succinct. If the journalist needs more information for a story they’ll ask for it – but being concise can make you a whole lot more appealing.

4. You Aren’t Contacting the Right Journalists
Some journalists are more than happy to take a press release with it and run with it, some are more determined to find other local stories, and will only look at press releases when they have time. You can find journalists or let journalists find you with Help A Reporter or Just Reach Out. These sites make it easy to pair with journalists who will be keen to publish your press releases, and also help you build great working relationships.

5. You’re Embellishing Too Much
When you send a press release, it’s pretty tempting to really try and promote your content, and sell it to the journalist in the hopes that they’ll sell it to their readers in the same way. In reality the press can turn your pitch into something great, so long as they have all of the basic information that they need to work with. Academized can help with your copywriting to make sure you stick to the point in your pitches.

6. You Don’t Verify Your Information
When you send details to a journalist they need to be able to fully verify everything you’ve told them, and you can make their lives easier and get your release out a lot faster by naming your sources. Whether your product is better because you’ve listened to research – and can provide a reference for the research, or because you’re using safe and approved materials, everything you’ve done is a lot more appealing to a journalist who can verify it. While writing up your references and sources is always annoying, Cite It In can make it easier.

7. You Aren’t Getting the Timing Right
Like all aspects of business, your PR pitches should by strategic and well times, and they should also be executed with precision. Minor details like monitoring, spelling, grammar, and word count, all easy to track with Easy Word Count, should be considered, as well as when is the most effective time to contact the press.

Overall, pitching PR to the media should be simple, and your emails can be incredibly effective so long as you avoid the mistakes listed above.

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July 17, 2017 ,
How Email Notifications Build User Trust
One of the great ironies of the boom in cloud services is how it has brought digital brands and human customers closer together than ever before. Companies today can reach customers whenever or however they need to, with an array of easy-to-use, low-cost tactics. More than that, brands have the ability to use specific cloud-based tools — such as email notifications — to build invaluable customer loyalty at minimal cost.

A central challenge for brands is to ensure that the communication is truly useful or relevant. This is where so many companies have erred in the past: With only limited tools to assess a customer’s desire for a particular marketing message (such as the tracking pixels that detect email opens), it was difficult to if a message was successful. Notifications today are backed by superior tracking technology, but more importantly, they are almost always created or chosen by customers themselves. Facebook and Instagram, for instance, offer a wide range of opt-in choices for either email or push notifications, which are then triggered automatically by status changes or new messages.

Email notifications today are a more advanced breed than their predecessors from earlier eras. Unlike unwanted or repetitive marketing messages, which customers typically ignore, email notifications are explicitly tied to specific actions a user has taken with a site or app — and therefore perceived as highly relevant or valuable information they need to know. Security offers the clearest example of relevant communication: Customers can receive an automated email wherever they are (and on whatever device) about login attempts and password changes, or during broader crises like Dropbox’s password breach. “It’s a way to involve the customer and deputize them,” Mark Schwanhausser of Javelin Strategy & Research explained in a recent interview with Nasdaq.
Giving users more power and involvement is a win-win beyond just security. As all of our activities — work, social life, shopping, entertainment — are managed digitally, we’re in need of constant information from our chosen brands to keep track and manage our lives.
To be sure, many of these notifications could be seen as potential spam — all it takes is a customer changing their mind about a message they previously opted into. But this is rarely the case for well-designed messaging. SMS notifications are opened 98 percent of the time within five minutes, according to Nielsen: hardly an indication that users are exhausted by messaging. Similarly, 70 percent of smartphone users consider all push notifications useful. This is true despite a sometimes huge volume of notifications: Slack, a chat app for business, sends a push every time a highlighted word (such as your name) appears in group chats. Despite the appearance of a deluge, users simply swipe away or delete any notifications that are unwanted.
But while ephemeral, easy-to-dismiss notifications such as SMS and push are great for some purposes, they don’t suit many notifications. For higher priority messages, email is often the first and only choice, and for good reason. For one, it’s an absolutely ubiquitous, omnipresent technology: on phones, smartwatches, laptops, even the Amazon Echo. It’s also a secure platform, with every message transparently routed and authenticated, and significant user account protection across all the major email providers. Permanence is yet another strong point, with inbox search allowing records to be found in a snap, whether it’s a discount code the user dismissed at first sight or a vital flight confirmation.

Finally, email is the only notification platform built for bi-directional communication — allowing your notification to turn into a conversation.

No matter which notification platform brands choose to deploy, building trust with customers starts with involving customers in the process — in choosing notifications, and using this feedback loop to make constant improvements. Businesses that test a variety of opt-in notifications are better positioned to discover what their customers truly care about, and how to discover the right balance between communication and disruption. Over time, messages designed in cooperation with users become second nature to both the company and customer. It’s difficult to imagine life today without notifications about security, social activity, incoming shipments, promotions and more.

And that’s why users are growing to trust brands that use notifications: More than marketing or even customer service, good notifications offer utility value and fulfill a customer need. While traditional messaging often leaves users fatigued by useless inbox fodder, cloud services have opened the way to communication that truly matters.

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Satish Kumar

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